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Abbott’s three oral hepatitis C drugs produce high cure rates in trial

9:54 am by | 0 Comments

(Reuters) - A trio of oral medicines from Abbott Laboratories Inc to treat hepatitis C produced unprecedented cure rates in patients who had previously failed to benefit from standard treatment, as well as very high cure rates for newly treated patients, Abbott said on Saturday.

Detailed data from the mid-stage trial, called Aviator, were released Saturday at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD) in Boston.

Investors and patients have very high hopes for the Abbott drugs - a protease inhibitor called ABT-450, a polymerase inhibitor ABT-333 and ABT-267 from a class known as NS5A inhibitors. They are used without interferon, an injectable standard treatment that causes flu-like symptoms.

Abbott said it plans to move ahead with large Phase III studies of the three drugs, used either with or without the standard antiviral pill ribavirin, based on favorable results seen in patients treated for eight weeks or twelve weeks in the Aviator study. Patients in the study had the most common, and hardest-to-treat, strain of hepatitis C known as Genotype 1.

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Some 93 percent of patients who failed prior therapy had a sustained viral response (SVR), meaning they were cured, after 12 weeks of taking the trio of new drugs, plus ribavirin.

"Nobody anywhere has broken the 50 percent mark in (cure rates) for this population," Scott Brun, a senior Abbott research executive said in an interview. "These are robust results."

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