Hospitals

Cuyahoga County’s largest health care systems to help uninsured get preventive care — MedCity Evening Read, Dec. 18, 2009

The Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals, MetroHealth and other Northeast Ohio health systems and free clinics formed a partnership Thursday to work together to help Cuyahoga County’s uninsured gain access to preventive, primary care medicine.

News and notes from a day in MedCity, Ohio:

The Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals, MetroHealth and other Northeast Ohio health systems and free clinics formed a partnership Thursday to work together to help Cuyahoga County’s uninsured gain access to preventive, primary care medicine, according to the Cleveland Plain Dealer. The group — called the Cuyahoga Health Access Project, or CHAP — has been meeting for more than two years and agreed at Thursday’s Cuyahoga County commission meeting. The group’s efforts had stalled early this summer after concerns over costs and staffing.

The Cleveland Clinic, City of Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Curves, YMCA of Greater Cleveland, Dave’s Markets and the American Heart Association said today they will join forces to launch go!FIT Greater Cleveland, a free, comprehensive public health campaign for Cuyahoga County adult residents, according to a joint press release.  The campaign is designed to improve the overall health and well-being of the county by breaking down barriers and increasing access to fitness and weight management facilities in the area. Participants receive free, limited-time memberships to Curves or YMCA locations in the county, as well as  free weight-control services and discount coupons on healthy foods.

More than 350 clinical trials professionals recently attended the inaugural session of CTrials, a new professional society in Israel for the advancement of biomedical research, according to the Cleveland Jewish News. CTrials is the first professional forum to serve as a source of knowledge and support for those involved in clinical trials in Israel. Beachwood’s economic development team has been instrumental in building bridges between the biomedical communities of Greater Cleveland and Israel to create new business opportunities.

Many small employers in Northeast Ohio aren’t fans of the latest health care reform bill proposed by the Senate, according to Crain’s Cleveland Business. The Council of Smaller Enterprises e-mailed a survey to its 17,000 members this week asking for opinions about health care reform. Of the more than 700 employers who responded, 90 percent said they were following the health care reform debate closely, and many of them don’t like what they see, said Steve Millard, COSE’s executive director. About 52 percent said they were against the Senate’s approach to health care reform, which largely addresses insurance but not overall health care costs, Millard said.

Ohio State University Medical Center has added more jobs in the past several years than any other major Central Ohio employer, with that growth expected to pick up pace as the health system mounts a $1 billion expansion, according to Business First of Columbus. ColumbusChamber Chief Economist Bill LaFayette, using Columbus Business First data and information from the medical center, found that the center employed 12,510 as of earlier this year. That’s the third-highest total behind the state of Ohio, the largest area employer with 24,492 workers, and JPMorgan Chase & Co., the area’s largest private employer with 14,689 workers.