Policy

Minnesota bill would help long-term care facilities navigate state bureaucracy

A summary of the latest developments in health care-related legislation in Minnesota: Five senators, including Sen. Julie Rosen, introduced a bill that would establish a “long-term care liaison office” in the Department of Health. The office would help guide nursing homes and assisted-living facilities in their dealings with state agencies on matters such as licensing […]

A summary of the latest developments in health care-related legislation in Minnesota:

Five senators, including Sen. Julie Rosen, introduced a bill that would establish a “long-term care liaison office” in the Department of Health. The office would help guide nursing homes and assisted-living facilities in their dealings with state agencies on matters such as licensing and insurance. The new office would also be charged with creating a list of recommendations that would “streamline” long-term facilities’ interaction with state-government agencies. A similar bill in the House has been referred to the Committee on Health Care and Human Services Policy and Oversight.

In other legislative news:

  • S.F. No. 3248 would authorize ambulance providers to impose a fee on local governments in areas they serve if the governments fail to pay for their services.
  • In a proposal that surely won’t sit well with health insurers, eight house members introduced a bill that bars insurers from offering health plans in the individual market unless they guarantee that customers who enroll in their health plans will have the right to renew enrollment. The so-called “guaranteed-issue” proposal essentially bans insurers’ ability to deny coverage based on a patient’s medical condition. A similar bill was proposed in the Senate.
  • Voicing their opposition to the federal health overhaul, four House members introduced a proposal urging the state’s federal Congressional delegation to vote against the legislation. The authors of the proposal say the health overhaul is “flawed in a number of troubling ways,” particularly the so-called individual mandate, which is has drawn lots of fire from conservatives.
  • A bill introduced in the House would create a prescription drug education program for doctors, pharmacists and other health providers.  The education program would be designed to provide information on cost-effective utilization of prescription drugs, incorporating relevant information about “clinical trials, pharmaceutical efficacy, adverse effects of drugs and evidence-based treatment options.” The bill was referred to the Health Care and Human Services Finance Division Committee.

Photo from flickr user KeithBurtis