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Is the super Salmonella strain too much for scientists? (Morning Read)

Federal health officials say they’ve made no progress in treating the spread of two Salmonella strains, the most common right now called S. Kentucky and the other called S. Heidelberg, that have proven to be resistant to the antibodies commonly used to treat salmonella poisoning.

In a new study in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, French scientists call for increased awareness among health, food and agricultural authorities to control the S. Kentucky strain before it spreads globally, like another troublesome strain of Salmonella, Typhimurium DT104, did in the 1990s. Food poisoning, most commonly caused by Salmonella, kills about 3,000 Americans a year.

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The super Salmonella strain. Federal health officials say they’ve made no progress in treating the spread of two Salmonella strains, the most common right now called S. Kentucky and the other called S. Heidelberg, that have proven to be resistant to the antibodies commonly used to treat salmonella poisoning.

In a new study in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, French scientists call for increased awareness among health, food and agricultural authorities to control the S. Kentucky strain of Salmonella before it spreads globally, like another troublesome strain, Typhimurium DT104, did  in the 1990s. Food poisoning, most commonly caused by Salmonella, kills about 3,000 Americans a year.

Investing in mobile health. Mobile healthcare investments have more than doubled in number since 2005, skyrocketing to record numbers in 2010, according to a new survey by Rock Health. But fundraising, for many small mobile health companies, is still the biggest challenge.

Shedding new light on biofilms on implantable medical devices. Implantable medical devices can improve a patient’s quality of life, but they can also be risky as they provide breeding ground for complex pathogens in the body that create biofilms that are resistant to the immune system and antibiotics. Researchers at the University of Iowa uncovered that these pathogens can actually create two types of biofilms, a discovery that they think will help drug developers create better treatments for removing the them from implantable medical devices  that are in the body for a long period of time.

Treatment for stings in the South. The FDA has just approved the first antivenom treatment for a scorpion sting, called Anascorp. Scorpion stings, which most prominent in Arizona, can cause nerve poisoning and breathing difficulties, especially in children.