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Medical devices for children: Heart pump shows progress (Morning Read)

A medical device for heart transplants in kids that is currently available in the U.S. only under a compassionate use protocol appears to be headed for FDA approval, according to the Wall Street Journal. The Berlin Heart, a medical device for children, can keep the heart beating for several months until a proper donor is located. Last month, an FDA panel unanimously supported the device, which uses small tubes to connect a child’s heart to a console that provides power to keep it beating. Under a National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute program called PumpKIN, four other devices for circulatory support in children under the age of 5 are also being developed.

Heart pump medical device for children. A medical device for heart transplants in kids that is currently available in the U.S. only under a compassionate use protocol appears to be headed for FDA approval, according to the Wall Street Journal. The Berlin Heart, a medical device for children, can keep the heart beating for several months until a proper donor is located. Last month, an FDA panel unanimously supported the device, which uses small tubes to connect a child’s heart to a console that provides power to keep it beating. Under a National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute program called PumpKIN, four other devices for circulatory support in children under the age of 5 are also being developed.

Yep, there’s an app for that. A new iPhone app called MelApp aims to help with the early detection of melanoma by using mathematical algorithms and pattern recognition technology to analyze images of suspect skin lesions or moles uploaded by users. A similar app, Skinscan for iOS was released earlier this year.

The Washington-Wall Street link. The noticeable drop in healthcare stocks on Monday continued yesterday over fears of cuts in federal government healthcare spending.

Another foodborne illness outbreak in the U.S. A strain of Salmonella that is resistant to many common antibiotics is behind a recent outbreak that has sickened nearly 80 people in 26 states. Ground turkey is the likely culprit.

How to: medical innovation. Forbes’ Matthew Herper offers seven steps to medical innovation, adapted from pharma bigshot Bernard Munos. Step number one? “Regain the trust of physicians, regulators and payers.”

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