MedCity Influencers

What is driving the surgical medical device market? (Best of MedCitizens)

Every week, MedCity News highlights the best of its MedCitizens: syndication partners and MedCity News readers who discuss life science current events on MedCitynews.com. Now here’s the best of what YOU had to say: Back to Basics: The Surgical Segment Heats Up With all the turmoil in the US healthcare market, a port in the […]

Every week, MedCity News highlights the best of its MedCitizens: syndication partners and MedCity News readers who discuss life science current events on MedCitynews.com.

Now here’s the best of what YOU had to say:

Back to Basics: The Surgical Segment Heats Up With all the turmoil in the US healthcare market, a port in the storm is not easy to find. A port that can accommodate an outsized tanker ship like Medtronic is even harder to locate. With two back-to-back acquisitions last month of Peak Surgical and Salient Surgical, the S.S. Medtronic took refuge in Surgery Harbor, committing nearly $600 million (net of previous ownership stakes) in a single day to nestle in with the hulking barges of Covidien and J&J.

Want to keep healthcare costs low? Try a cost-benefit analysis. A few months back, The New York Times reported on 2 new drugs, approved by the FDA for cancer treatment. Provenge, a new drug for prostate cancer extends life by 4 months at a cost of $93,000. Impressed? Wait, there’s more. Yervoy, a treatment for melanoma also extends life by 4 months at a cost of $120,000. Are these two treatments under the line or over the line? In my view, as a spectator and not a sufferer of either disease, I think they should both be directly in the line of fire.

Business incubators can help healthcare entrepreneurs who need cash. With venture capital firms on the sidelines– at least for a while– healthcare entrepreneurs have to get innovative about how they can raise some capital. The key word there is “innovative.”

Medical device management often underestimated. With the explosion of medical devices to treat various medical ailments in medicine, we have seen significant improvements in quality and quantity of life. An underappreciated consequence of all of these electronic device therapies, however, has been the manpower and expertise required to manage these implanted electronic medical devices long-term.

Community health centers deserve better than ‘safety net’ label. What do you think when you hear the term “safety net provider?” It doesn’t make a very positive brand impression, does it? Trapeze artists are glad that there’s a safety net underneath them, but they sure as heck don’t want to fall into it. If they screwed up and landed there they wouldn’t go around telling all their friends how great it was. And there’s absolutely no chance they’d rather perform in the net than up above.

Chris Seper runs MedCityNews.com and contributes regularly to the site. He is the vice president of healthcare for Breaking Media, MedCity's corporate owners. Reach him at [email protected].

This post appears through the MedCity Influencers program. Anyone can publish their perspective on business and innovation in healthcare on MedCity News through MedCity Influencers. Click here to find out how.

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