Devices & Diagnostics

Startup to develop textile products for medical device sector

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s approval of the first catheter-based aortic heart valve replacement that doesn’t require open-heart surgery was an exciting medical advance announced last week. For Thomas Molz, CEO of US BioDesign, an original equipment manufacturer startup serving the medical device industry, it’s a potential opportunity. “One of the textile [structures] we’re […]

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s approval of the first catheter-based aortic heart valve replacement that doesn’t require open-heart surgery was an exciting medical advance announced last week. For Thomas Molz, CEO of US BioDesign, an original equipment manufacturer startup serving the medical device industry, it’s a potential opportunity.

“One of the textile [structures] we’re looking at is a blood filter that would be capable of filtering  cholesterol and calcium particles,” Molz said.

Molz and chief technology officer Skott Greenhalgh launched US BioDesign two months ago in Perkasie, Pennsylvania. They are working on custom-designed textile structures for the medical device industry.

Both worked in the medical device industry for several years and founded Secant Medical in 2002, which was later acquired by Prodesco and then later bought by Fenner. They also are the directors of Stout Medical Group, which develops novel technology for the medical device industry.

Other areas ripe for their business include the growing trend in biologics — laboratories growing artificial organs. The company would develop the scaffold onto which the cells are seeded.

US BioDesign will target products and services in the cardiovascular, orthopedic, general surgery and neurological device segments of the healthcare industry. It will also establish relationships with other medical device OEM firms to broaden the company’s breadth of expertise and product offerings.

Self-funded, the company is looking at private investment of up to $1 million.