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CEO resigns from personalized cancer treatment testing and dosage firm

A biotechnology company that develops tests to determine dosages for more personalized cancer treatments has begun looking for a new CEO after the current head of the company submitted his resignation for family reasons. He will be replaced by a senior vice-president from Life Sciences Greenhouse of Central Pennsylvania, an incubator and investor in the […]

A biotechnology company that develops tests to determine dosages for more personalized cancer treatments has begun looking for a new CEO after the current head of the company submitted his resignation for family reasons. He will be replaced by a senior vice-president from Life Sciences Greenhouse of Central Pennsylvania, an incubator and investor in the biotechnology startup.

Edward Erickson’s resignation from Saladax Biomedical in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania will be effective February 12, though he will continue to serve as a board member, according to a press statement.

Kevin Harter, the co-founder of the Life Sciences Greenhouse, will serve as interim CEO until a replacement can be found.

The greenhouse serves as a public-private partnership where Harter manages a portfolio of early-stage biotech, medical device, and diagnostic companies. Harter served as an executive chairman of Saladax from 2007-2011.

Saladax develops and commercializes novel diagnostic tests for more personalized cancer treatment as well as for new and existing therapeutics. Its dose management technology enables physicians to optimize drug dosing to meet individual patient needs, leading to improved response and quality of life, according to its website.

The transition comes at a significant period in the company’s development. Saladax Biomedical is in the midst of finalizing development of its next two oncology drug assays for paclitaxel and docetaxel. It expects to have a CE mark for them no later than the second quarter of 2012, Erickson said in an e-mailed response to questions. He added the company has not decided additional assays to complete at this time.

Last year it closed a $9 million debt facility with GE Capital.

Erickson has several years’ experience as a biotech CEO. He took diagnostics companies Immunicon and Cholestech public, along with DepoTech, a drug delivery company, public as CEO.