Hospitals

Morning Read: Nhumi uses adverse event data to map out drug risks

An IBM data visualization team has built  a tool to map out the risks of taking a particular drug, based on  data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Adverse Event Reporting System. Nhumi allows the user to select a drug and then view a page that shows what parts of the body may be […]

An IBM data visualization team has built  a tool to map out the risks of taking a particular drug, based on  data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Adverse Event Reporting System.
Nhumi allows the user to select a drug and then view a page that shows what parts of the body may be affected by the drug.
The user can select a particular indication for the drug and compare similar medications. The drug profile includes demographic data as well as a basic profile of the medication. Check out the Avastin heat map here.

Comparing two recent studies suggests that check-up phone calls to patients may be more effective than a web site focused on quality reporting for supporting successful outcomes.
Geisinger Health Plan found automated calls to patients reduced 30-day hospital readmission rates by 44% for people with congestive heart failure. Data from the calls is stored in the electronic health record and then analyzed to see if a follow-up visit is needed.
By contrast, CMS’s Hospital Compare web site has little effect on 30-day mortality rates for heart attack and pneumonia, according to an analysis of Medicare claims data from 2000 to 2008.  In 2005, CMS began posting quality ratings for more than 3,000 U.S. hospitals on its Hospital Compare website including data points such adherence to basic clinical care guidelines, patient experience scores, readmission rates, mortality rates and complication rates.

One trend that is continuing in the same direction is hospital stay costs for Americans. The 2011 Comparative Price Report found the average cost per hospital stay in the United States was $15,734 followed by $5,004 in Germany and $4,948 in Chile. Download a copy here.

On Wednesday, the House moved one step closer to killing part of the health care reform law designed to manage costs. The House Energy and Commerce Committee voted to repeal the Independent Payment Advisory Board. The commission is to be made up of health care professionals and would monitor and ensure savings in the Medicare program without affecting coverage or quality.

Mhealth efforts may have a better chance at helping people save money on health than committees. A new study shows that there are  500 mobile health projects underway around the world. A telecom company in Norway commissioned the study that looked at efforts in 12 countries and found that mobile health can:Reduce costs of elderly care by 25 percent

  • Reduce maternal and perinatal mortality by 30 percent
  • Allow twice as many rural patients to be reached per physician
  • Improve Tuberculosis treatment compliance by between 30 percent and 70 percent
  • Reduce costs related to data collection by about 24 percent