MedCity Influencers

A doctor’s argument against pay for performance in healthcare (Best of MedCitizens)

Every week, MedCity News highlights the best of its MedCitizens: syndication partners and MedCity News readers who discuss life science current events on MedCityNews.com. Now here’s the best of what YOU had to say.

Every week, MedCity News highlights the best of its MedCitizens: syndication partners and MedCity News readers who discuss life science current events on MedCityNews.com.

Now here’s the best of what YOU had to say:

Pay for performance has no place in healthcare. “When an irritating high school student raises his hand and annoys the teacher with the inquiry, ‘Is this gonna be on the test?,’ it is a forerunner of the concept of pay for performance. The Ivy League seeking student won’t study material that he knows won’t appear on the exam. Similarly, physicians and medical institutions will focus their attentions on achieving those outcomes that will be measured and graded, which might be at the expense of patients who ‘are not on the exam.’ For example, if irritable bowel syndrome isn’t being measured, but GERD is, then will these patients be treated the same?”

Getting investors to say yes: 6 elements of a persuasive pitch. “Investors want to know that you and your management team have the experience and skills to make this concept succeed. If you are lacking certain key team members, make sure that the investors are aware of this, as they may be able to recommend appropriate additions to your team.”

The Affordable Care Act: Implications for emerging medtech companies. “It is nearly possible to establish the kind of evidence to support clinical effectiveness in the size of studies normally conducted under an IDE before a product is commercial. Comparative effectiveness research on an existing market competitor could create an opportunity for an emerging company, for example if the company can demonstrate reduced costs (e.g. fewer complications) or improved outcomes with their device compared to the one just trashed by PCORI.”

Will cost-sharing be enough to create more smart healthcare consumers?  “The first iteration of consumer-driven health care hasn’t yielded a health citizenry of savvy shoppers. Instead, too many consumers delay necessary health care, split prescribed pills, and forgo recommended clinical tests to save “their” money. With high-deductible health plans reaching $2,000 in 2012, consumers lack health plan literacy: the toolkit of just how to smartly use their new health plan design.”

Proposed Obamacare regulation could limit approved drugs to one per class. “A draft regulation proposed by the Department of Health and Human Services would require insurers participating in the law’s new exchanges to cover only a single drug in each class of pharmaceuticals. That could be a disaster for both patients and doctors.”

[Photo from flickr user UC Davis College of Engineering]

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