Devices & Diagnostics

Life sciences industry salary survey proves the gender gap is alive and well

New data from The Scientist‘s recent salary analysis survey points to a tried-and-true tale in the life sciences industry: Industry pays more than academia, Americans make more than their global counterparts and men take home more money than women. American men in the life sciences make on average $110,594 a year. American women? More than $30,000 […]

New data from The Scientist‘s recent salary analysis survey points to a tried-and-true tale in the life sciences industry: Industry pays more than academia, Americans make more than their global counterparts and men take home more money than women. American men in the life sciences make on average $110,594 a year. American women? More than $30,000 less: $76,930.

European salaries ranged widely, but the average there was more than $70K for men, a little under $60K for women. In India, the average overall was only $11,186.

The survey also shows “(t)oday’s hot life-science specialty is often tomorrow’s overcrowded field. Case in point: genomics versus genetics. . . . according to this year’s survey, the average U.S. academic in genomics earns more than $92,000 per year, while those in genetics pull in just $77,600.”

The best-paying life sciences field on average? The drug discovery, development and delivery industry, raking in a little more than $162,000. That’s right: Pharmaceuticals have the kwan. But biotech industry employees aren’t too far behind, earning on average more than $150,000.

Click here to see beautiful infographics slicing the results.

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