BioBots finds a way to make 3D bioprinter more accessible

A company that’s developed its own 3D bioprinter for engineers and researchers interested in advancing 3D printing applications for biologics launched the device at DreamIt Health’s demo day this week. Most people are familiar with 3D printing applications in healthcare from the publicity generated from orthopedic products such as bone implants made from plastic. But […]

A company that’s developed its own 3D bioprinter for engineers and researchers interested in advancing 3D printing applications for biologics launched the device at DreamIt Health’s demo day this week.

Most people are familiar with 3D printing applications in healthcare from the publicity generated from orthopedic products such as bone implants made from plastic. But Biobiots has developed a way to produce biological structures. It has spent some of its time in DreamIt Health’s accelerator finetuning its printer. Its biologics cartridges come with a $600 price tag.

BioBots’ approach involves using a novel curing process that doesn’t mutate cells.The idea is for medical researchers and bioengineers to use the printer to develop skin, ears — that was part of its demo, and other organs to help advance this area of medical innovation.

Another DreamIt Health grad, TrueClaim, wants to help consumers flag up suspicious claims on their medical bills within a two-day timeframe. The idea is to help people avoid paying higher medicals than they should be. Given that the National Health Care Antifraud Association said that more than four billion health insurance claims were processed in the United States there and billing errors are common, the company has a ginormous  market opportunity. The company asks patients about their care to verify and validate medical claims so they only pay for the care they received. Co-founder and CEO Kasey Sousa said Independence Blue Cross is adopting the technology for 250,000 members. It also plans to roll it out to five of its largest payers.

RegDesk stepped onto the Philly health IT scene at a StartUp Weekend Health event at Venturef0rth earlier this year. with a match.com for medical device and biotech companies seeking regulatory pathway advice from consultants. It helps companies find the best consultant for their needs based on budget and expertise, among other factors. It has grown to 33 clients and has completed five projects. It opened a seed round to increase its geographic spread.

TowerView Health is gearing up for a 200 patient pilot of its connected pill box to boost medication adherence for people with chronic conditions. Co-founder Nick Valilis explained his inspiration for starting the company came from the complexities of taking several medications after he was diagnosed with leukemia a few weeks into the start of medical school.

 

Photo credit: Mark B Greenberg of Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership at SCH Academy