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Institute of Medicine to docs: Get rid of conflicts — MedCity morning read, April 29

The Institute of Medicine said in a report that doctors should stop taking much of the money, gifts and free drug samples they routinely accept from drug and device companies. It was a more stinging report than a similar one issued last year by the Association of American Medical Colleges, which prompted policy changes among medical professionals.

WASHINGTON — The Institute of Medicine — the nation’s most influential medical advisory group and part of the National Academy of Sciences – has said doctors should stop taking much of the money, gifts and free drug samples they routinely accept from drug and device companies, according to the New York Times.

The institute’s report is a stinging indictment of many of the most common means drug and device companies use to endear themselves to doctors, hospitals and medical schools, the Times reported.

“It is time for medical schools to end a number of long-accepted relationships and practices that create conflicts of interest, threaten the integrity of their missions and their reputations, and put public trust in jeopardy,” the report concluded.

In its report, the institute calls on medical professionals from university professors to family doctors to shun practices that have become commonplace in the past three decades.

The institute’s report is even more damning than a similar one released last year by the Association of American Medical Colleges, which proposed tough new rules to govern relationships between medical schools and drug companies, the Times said.

Many medical schools and societies tightened their policies following the association’s report. The institute’s report is likely to hasten that process.

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Photo illustration from www.edflix.org.

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