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Researchers conclude mercury levels do not attribute to autism in children — MedCity Morning Read Oct. 20, 2009

But will a study like this do anything in the battle between medical knowledge and fear over vaccines? It’s hard to believe so, considering the mountains of evidence already about autism and vaccines.

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Advocates and parents claiming that mercury from fish, dental fillings, vaccines and industrial emissions is responsible for autism fueled a research study by the University of California, Davis which concluded the claims were without merit, Reuters reported.

Researchers initially found lower mercury levels in autistic children aged 2 to 5 because they eat less fish than other children. After the results were adjusted for fish consumptions, levels were determined to be normal, according to Reuters.

“Just as autism is complex, with great variation in severity and presentation, it is highly likely that its causes will be found to be equally complex,” Irva Hertz-Picciotto, the leader of the study, said in a statement.

Autism refers to a variation of diseases, ranging from severe inability to communicate and mental retardation to relatively mild symptoms. Autism is more common that previously thought, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said this month, affecting one in 91 children, including one in 58 boys, according to Reuters.

But will a study like this do anything in the battle between medical knowledge and fear over vaccines? It’s hard to believe so, considering the mountains of evidence already about autism and vaccines.

Autism research is expected to receive a large amount of cash from President Obama’s $5 billion plan to increase U.S. medical and scientific research, Reuters reported.

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