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NEOUCOM appoints first-ever dean of graduate studies

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy has appointed its first-ever dean of college graduate studies. Walter Horton Jr. is a 12-year veteran of  NEOUCOM, and also works as the college’s vice president for research, according to a statement. Prior to NEOUCOM, Horton spent 10 years conducting arthritis research at the National Institutes of […]

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy has appointed its first-ever dean of college graduate studies.

Walter Horton Jr. is a 12-year veteran of  NEOUCOM, and also works as the college’s vice president for research, according to a statement. Prior to NEOUCOM, Horton spent 10 years conducting arthritis research at the National Institutes of Health and also worked for Indianapolis-based drugmaker Eli Lilly & Co.

Horton has a bachelor’s degree in zoology from Kent State University and a Ph.D. in anatomy and cell biology from the University of Cincinnati.

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Horton’s new position came about partly at the behest of former NEOUCOM president Lois Nora, who before her departure suggested the college split the jobs of college president and medical school dean. In October, NEOUCOM hired a new president, Jay Gershen, former vice chancellor of external affairs at the University of Colorado Denver. With Horton’s appointment, Nora’s suggestion has come to fruition.

Created in 1973 to boost the number of family-practice physicians in the area, NEOUCOM accepts students out of high school and lets them start four years of medical school after as few as two years at feeder universities. Students graduate with Bachelor’s of Science and medical or pharmacy degrees.

In mid-2008, Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland signed into law a bill that added Cleveland State University to University of Akron and Kent State and Youngstown State universities, which feed students to the medical college.

Last year, NEOUCOM pulled in more than $10 million for research funding, its largest total for any year, according to the statement.