MedCity Influencers

Best of MedCitizens: Medical innovation & Obamacare

Every week, MedCity News highlights the best of its MedCitizens: syndication partners and MedCity News readers who contribute to MedCityNews.com. The MedCitizens are sponsored by MyPRGenie, the only Do-It-Yourself, PR platform and news wire that gives you access to more than 540,000 journalist contacts. Now here’s the best of what YOU had to say:

Every week, MedCity News highlights the best of its MedCitizens: syndication partners and MedCity News readers who contribute to MedCityNews.com. The MedCitizens are sponsored by MyPRGenie, the only Do-It-Yourself, PR platform and news wire that gives you access to more than 540,000 journalist contacts.

Now here’s the best of what YOU had to say:

  • New innovative medical devices require more than docs. “This may be sacrilegious to say, but surgical assistants often understand surgical tools and instrumentation better than surgeons. This does not mean that they are more proficient using them, but that they grasp the design attributes that affect performance and can provide more technical feedback.”
  • Health IT, healthcare reform, transparency: a wish list. “Thanks to advances in IT adoption by providers and patients, Kaiser’s Dr. Ted Eytan (@tedeytan) expresses confidence that, ’The patient will finally become a customer of health care.’”
  • Private practice doctors: Another Obamacare casualty? “Paying more for treatment doesn’t necessarily guarantee better access or quality. Without an ownership stake in their practices, salaried doctors have an incentive to work the hours for which they’re paid — and no more. Fewer hours for doctors means fewer appointments for patients.”
  • Fond farewell to the biotech industry’s founding father. “Eugene Goldwasser, whose government-funded research began as a Cold War experiment to cure radiation sickness, found and purified erythropoietin, or EPO, which is a naturally-occurring hormone produced by the kidneys to stimulate new red blood cell production. Today, genetically-engineered versions of EPO cure anemia in dialysis and cancer patients and generate billions of dollars in sales for Amgen, Johnson & Johnson and Roche.”

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