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The biggest threat to accountable care organizations (Morning Read)

Among today’s current medical news: the biggest problem confronting the accountable care organization model, a bidding war for Astra Tech, how to get decontaminated from radiation and what makes a hospital great.

Current medical news and unique business news for anyone who cares about the healthcare industry.

Trouble ahead for ACOs? The fee-for-service payment system represents a serious threat to the adoption of the accountable care organization model, according to a study in Health Affairs. “As long as fee-for-service payment systems remain an option, general practitioners will be reluctant to embrace coordinated care because it would give them less autonomy in how they practice,” according to the study.

Astra Tech bidding heats up: AstraZeneca’s Astra Tech, a Swedish unit that makes dental implants and medical devices, is drawing the interest of a number of potential buyers, including Zimmer and Biomet. The unit is expected to sell for about $2 billion.

What makes a hospital great? It’s not the latest technology or superstar doctors. Instead, improving patient outcomes may require first investing in and focusing on the culture of the organization itself.

How do you get decontaminated after radiation exposure? It doesn’t take much. About “95 percent” of decontamination simply involves removing your clothing and taking a shower.

Match Day is kind to primary care: The number of U.S. medical school seniors who will begin residency training in family medicine in jumped 11 percent this year, marking the second consecutive year of growth in the field.

Regulatory clarity for mhealth? The FDA is expected to provide guidance on how it plans to regulate mobile medical applications before the year is over.

For future doctors: Ezra Klein’s frank and insightful talking points from a speech to the American Medical Student Association should be required reading for current and future doctors.

In the future, either doctors will make less money than they are expecting to make now or there will be fewer of them than we project there will be now (perhaps because there will be more nurse practitioners and MinuteClinics). Politicians don’t like to say this clearly, but it’s true.