MedCity Influencers

Entrepreneurship lessons learned from Boston Scientific (Best of MedCitizens)

Every week, MedCity News highlights the best of its MedCitizens: syndication partners and MedCity News readers who discuss life science current events on MedCityNews.com. Now here’s the best of what YOU had to say.

Every week, MedCity News highlights the best of its MedCitizens: syndication partners and MedCity News readers who discuss life science current events on MedCityNews.com.

Now here’s the best of what YOU had to say:

The legacy of Boston Scientific for medtech entrepreneurs. “Our mission in life is to work with the small-fry companies who aspire to become (or more often be bought by) the BSC’s of the world, so we set out to mine the Boston Scientific story for nuggets of wisdom for the emerging med tech community.”

Medtronic shows us what a “crime against science” looks like. “Medtronic may not have admitted guilt in paying bribes. But its tacit admission that it made payments (it agreed to a $23.5 million settlement) was a crime against science. The latter, it seems to me, is far worse for a company that purports to be science-based.”

Playing devil’s advocate: Health IT doesn’t improve quality, cut costs. “Given that I’m ‘The Healthcare IT Guy’ I am accustomed to taking the opposite position (that the act of patient self-management usually does enhance care quality and reduce costs)…(but) Joe Ternullo asked me to take the position against the premise of the Connected Health Symposium to make sure we left no stone unturned in evaluating the real benefits because we need to critically appraise patient self-management.”

Innovative cardiac care? Try talking to patients (and stop blaming hospitals). “But maybe we can make lemonade our of lemons when it comes to innovation to prevent heart failure. Maybe we can realize the importance of people interacting with people and the time necessary to assure better outcomes in heart failure. And maybe, just maybe, we should realize that even with all the technology in the world, expensive medications and expensive testing, that penalizing doctors and health care providers who spend the time with patients just because they present again to a hospital might be exactly the wrong approach to address our readmission issue.”

We shop locally and eat locally. So why don’t we invest locally? “’What would the world be like if we invested 50 percent of our assets within 50 miles of where we live?’”

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