News

Morning Read: Exemption process not working for doctors missing Medicare e-prescribing goals

Some doctors are being hit with a 1% penalty on 2012 Medicare payments for failing to hit e-prescribing targets, despite a process for requesting a hardship exemption. The American Medical Association is asking the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to re-evaluate the penalty timelines associated with the e-prescribing incentive program, as well as other […]

Some doctors are being hit with a 1% penalty on 2012 Medicare payments for failing to hit e-prescribing targets, despite a process for requesting a hardship exemption. The American Medical Association is asking the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to re-evaluate the penalty timelines associated with the e-prescribing incentive program, as well as other health information technology incentive programs due to confusion around requirements and exemption status.

Mark Midei describes himself as a victim of circumstances in his version of the battle between MidAtlantic Cardiovascular and St. Joseph’s Hospital. The former cardiologist says he can’t get a job taking blood pressure at Wal-Mart due to the multiple lawsuits and general disgrace that resulted from the charges that he implanted unnecessary stents out of greed.

The Supreme Court’s Prometheus v. Mayo decision reflects the same difficulties the courts have had in trying to determine how much patent protection software should have. Since the 1970s, the court has changed direction multiple times in terms of requirements and standards, with the latest test being “machine-or-transformation test.” The Prometheus decision confuses even this standard and offers no good replacement.

A Food and Drug Administration panel has recommended approval of a new drug for overactive bladder. Astellas Pharma should hear about final approval for mirabegron by the end of June.

Requiring insurance companies to cover preventable care will force consumers to shop around for cheaper providers. A recent study shows that costs vary as much as 700% for some exams. More insurers now are collecting price information for consumers so they can pick the cheapest provider.