Hospitals

With rubber duckies & superheroes, designers put a kid-friendly twist on chemotherapy

The importance of good design in healthcare takes on a whole new meaning when we talk about pediatric care. Children’s hospitals are filled with art, music, color, plants, natural light – anything to mask the bleak, eerie feel of a sterile environment. Lately, I’ve noticed healthcare facilities and innovators seem to be also paying more […]

The importance of good design in healthcare takes on a whole new meaning when we talk about pediatric care. Children’s hospitals are filled with art, music, color, plants, natural light – anything to mask the bleak, eerie feel of a sterile environment.

Lately, I’ve noticed healthcare facilities and innovators seem to be also paying more attention to the little things that might impact a patient’s stay in the hospital. Here are two neat design ideas I recently came across aimed at distracting children from the reason that they’re in the hospital in the first place.

The first concept, designed by Jung Hyun Min, adds some color and distraction to the process of fluid transfusion for kids. It’s a clear, floating ball with a small rubber ducky inside. Designed to be put inside of a standard fluid bag, the “Halo Duck” bobs around as the fluid level drops. When the transfusion is complete and the bag is empty, it serves as a plug in the tube hold to prevent the back-flow of blood.

sponsored content

A Deep-dive Into Specialty Pharma

A specialty drug is a class of prescription medications used to treat complex, chronic or rare medical conditions. Although this classification was originally intended to define the treatment of rare, also termed “orphan” diseases, affecting fewer than 200,000 people in the US, more recently, specialty drugs have emerged as the cornerstone of treatment for chronic and complex diseases such as cancer, autoimmune conditions, diabetes, hepatitis C, and HIV/AIDS.

Halo duck from minjenny on Vimeo.

A.C. Camargo Cancer Center in Brazil and ad agency JWT Brazil took that concept a step further by transforming chemotherapy into “superformula.” Based on the idea that believing in the cure is the first step in fighting cancer, they created cases that disguise chemotherapy IV bags. The agency also produced a series of cartoons and comic books in which superheroes face challenges reflective of those faced by cancer patients, and recover with the help of “superformula.”