A healthcare analytics expert’s advice to entrepreneurs: Know how to operationalize

One of the hottest areas for innovation in healthcare IT right now is data analytics, a topic Pamela Peele knows well. She’s the chief analytics officer of the UPMC Insurance Services Division and at Evolent Health. At the upcoming MidAmerica Health Venture Forum, she’ll be sitting down with Crain’s Chicago Business reporter Andrew Wang for […]

Pamela Peele

 

 

One of the hottest areas for innovation in healthcare IT right now is data analytics, a topic Pamela Peele knows well.

She’s the chief analytics officer of the UPMC Insurance Services Division and at Evolent Health. At the upcoming MidAmerica Health Venture Forum, she’ll be sitting down with Crain’s Chicago Business reporter Andrew Wang for a one-on-one chat to address data analytics activities, economic modeling and statistical analysis in healthcare.

Corporate business development executives like Peele will meet up with active healthcare investors and startups April 22-23 in Chicago for MidAmerica Health Venture Forum. The event will showcase emerging innovations and dealflow originating in the Midwest.

To get to know the speakers better before the event, we asked each of them the same four questions.

Be sure to register for the event — there’s still time — and join our LinkedIn group for the event.

Who influenced you to get involved in healthcare and/or investing?

No one person. Many people along the convoluted and unplanned path I took from working in a hospital as a registered EEG tech to a PhD in economics.

What do you think is the most important change happening in healthcare today?

The rise of the educated patient, who is taking on more cost sharing and financial risk as their insurance plans transition to more risk sharing and less first dollar coverage. Patients who want and need to understand, control, and manage their own health and associated health care costs. Also the desire to use a doctor as a consultant in conjunction with a variety of tools and applications to manage chronic conditions and to monitor and understand areas such as sleeping and calorie consumption.

What is your biggest pitch pet peeve/what’s the most bizarre pitch you’ve ever received?

This isn’t a pet peeve, but it is a funny story….The most bizarre press interaction I have ever had was when a reporter for a very well-known, top-tier news organization asked me if ‘eye popping’ was a condition that most doctors would recognize! I had used the phrase ‘eye popping’ to describe the results we were getting from some of our work.

What’s one piece of advice you would give to an entrepreneur?

Know the industry and know how to operationalize. There are a million good ideas a day floating around. The winner is the person who understands the value of the ideas (know your industry and market) and who will benefit (who will be the buyer) and then can turn an idea into a product or service (execution, execution, execution). My philosophy for most things is pretty simple. Live below your means and follow the twinkle in your eye.