Drug developer with kidney disease treatment raises $13M ahead of IND filing

Complexa, a drug developer using synthetic fatty acids to treat chronic and acute kidney disease, has raised $13 million in a Series B financing round, according to a company statement. The new funding comes as it prepares to file an IND for an oral formulation for chronic kidney disease and will help advance its Phase […]

Complexa, a drug developer using synthetic fatty acids to treat chronic and acute kidney disease, has raised $13 million in a Series B financing round, according to a company statement. The new funding comes as it prepares to file an IND for an oral formulation for chronic kidney disease and will help advance its Phase 1 stage treatment for contrast-induced nephropathy, a complication from medical imaging.

Chronic kidney disease affects an estimated 20 million people, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control.

Complexa developed a synthetic form of nitro fatty acids that aid in shutting down harmful inflammatory pathways and activate the body’s protective mechanisms against inflammation.

JAFCO Life Science Investment led the Series B round and current investors also took part. Among its investors are Scientific Health Development, Wistar Morris Foundation and UpStart.

Its drug, CXA-10, will be used in an IV form to treat acute kidney injuries caused by an inflammatory reaction to dye injections from medical imaging.  It is associated with a higher risk of in-hospital and 1-year mortality, even in patients who do not need dialysis. It began Phase 1 trials earlier this month to assess safety and pharmacokinetics.

The use of intravenous contrast to enhance computed tomography imaging has increased in recent years, according to a paper published in The Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. So the number of contrast-induced nephropathy cases could increase. The biotechnology company sees applications for its drug beyond these kidney conditions, including neurodegenerative and fibrotic-related therapeutic areas.