Human brains were the target in a recent robbery (including one belonging to a murderer)

At the University of Texas, there was a robbery. It wasn’t students in ski masks stealing the answer sheet to a serious exam or even money from a cafeteria cash register (not that there would be much incentive there). A collection of 100 human brains were stolen, one of which apparently belonged to the 1966 clock tower sniper […]

At the University of Texas, there was a robbery. It wasn’t students in ski masks stealing the answer sheet to a serious exam or even money from a cafeteria cash register (not that there would be much incentive there).

A collection of 100 human brains were stolen, one of which apparently belonged to the 1966 clock tower sniper Charles Whitman.

Psychology professor and co-curator of the collection Tim Schallert said that the university suspects that the brains were stolen, but they don’t actually know for sure what happened to the organs. Co-curator Lawrence Cormack theorizes that word about the collection got out, and students nabbed them for use as Halloween decorations or pranks.

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Some of the brains the university had in collection were kept in a lab, but the ones stored in the basement are the ones that were nabbed. Whitman was the infamous killer, 24-years-old  at the time, who stood atop the 307-foot-tall clock tower in Austin and killed 16 people while wounding 32 others.

Chances are this was part of an elaborate, and pretty gross prank, but time will tell what happened once the brains are recovered.

[Photo from Rev314159]