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SXSW resonates in health: 5 must-read stories from MedCity News this week

Every week, we compile the most trafficked and thoughtful stories on MedCity News. This week, healthcare-related stories originating at the recent South By Southwest festival struck a cord with our readers:

SXSW

Every week, we compile the most trafficked and thoughtful stories on MedCity News. This week, healthcare-related stories originating at the recent South By Southwest festival struck a cord with our readers:

1. Johnson & Johnson has rolled out a crowdfunding website to support global public health initiatives

A crowdfunding website dedicated to global public health initiatives by healthcare nonprofits hopes to provide a funding vehicle for much-needed healthcare resources for developing countries. Johnson & Johnson is behind CaringCrowd and launched the website in September.

2. Digital health takes a back seat to medical devices in pediatric pitch event at SXSW

Measuring lung function, enhancing fetal monitoring and tissue engineering took the top three prizes at the second edition of Impact Pediatric Health Pitch atSXSW. But of the digital health technologies on display, machine learning was a big theme.

3. Physicians starting to get overwhelmed by clinical messaging

Secure clinical messaging promises to improve communications between healthcare providers and promote continuity of care, but office-based physicians are starting to get overwhelmed with e-mail, just like the rest of us. It’s a particularly serious problem for primary care physicians, according to a research letter published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine.

4. Forthcoming app wants to turn kids with T1D into ‘diabetes ninjas’

Controlling chronic diseases is about building good habits, and to get children and teens with Type 1 diabetes into healthy routines, the method has to be fun. Dr. Jennifer Shine Dyer, a pediatric endocrinologist and app developer in Columbus, Ohio, wants to turn each of her T1D patients into a “diabetes ninja” with a new mobile game she’s building.

5. CMIO quits over EHR implementation, cites Challenger report

The ex-CMIO of two New York City public hospitals so hated the way the city’s health department was rolling out an electronic health records system that he quoted the official report of the 1986 Challenger disaster in his resignation letter. He warned of safety issues if the arbitrary EHR implementation deadline didn’t get pushed back.

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