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Colcrys: the dark side of market exclusivity (Morning Read)

After the FDA approved gout medicine Colcrys, the manufacturer brought a lawsuit seeking to remove any other versions of colchicine from the market and raised the price by a factor of more than 50, from $0.09 per pill to $4.85 per pill, according to a New England Journal of Medicine article quoted in db’s Medical Rants blog.

Highlights of the important and interesting in the world of healthcare:

Market exclusivity = bad things. After the FDA approved gout medicine Colcrys, the manufacturer brought a lawsuit seeking to remove any other versions of colchicine from the market and raised the price by a factor of more than 50, from $0.09 per pill to $4.85 per pill, according to a New England Journal of Medicine article quoted in db’s Medical Rants blog.

Advanced primary care a cure for technology addiction? “I believe that we as a country have a love affair with technology and feel more comfortable relying on specialist-controlled technology for symptom interpretation in the same manner that we like the mechanic to ‘hook the car up to the computer,'” blogs KevinMD.

Snake oil peddlers sold public on health reform. The Patient Protection and Unaffordable Care Act (Obamacrap) is delivering silent tax increases to fund the mess, opines InsureBlog as it reveals the “truth” about 13 tax changes that are on the way.

No relief for rising medical costs. Medical costs are expected to  grow between 10 percent and 11 percent in 2011 — roughly eight-times inflation in the Consumer Price Index, writes HEALTHPopuli blog.

Glaxo opens door to pain market. After GlaxoSmithKline PLC decided to exit neurological fields in February, three venture capital firms jumped on the chance to carve out a business from GSK’s pain market, according to the Wall Street Journal Venture Capital Dispatch blog.

Healthcare is biggest piece of IPO pie. Healthcare companies, including gene-sequencing outfits Complete Genomics and Pacific Biosciences, account for the largest piece of the 49 U.S.-based venture-backed companies that are in the midst of initial public offerings, says another entry in the WSJ’s VC blog.