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‘Consumer engagement is terrible’ for mPHRs (Morning Read)

A September report by Deloitte that predicts the mobile personal health record as the next killer app is wrong, according to a MobiHealthNews panel. “With all due respect…. There is a big problem with the PHR business,” Healthrageous Chief Technical Officer Doug McClure said, “consumer engagement is terrible.”

Highlights of the important and interesting in the world of healthcare:

Deloitte is wrong about mPHR. A September report by Deloitte that predicts the mobile personal health record as the next killer app is wrong, according to a MobiHealthNews panel. “With all due respect…. There is a big problem with the PHR business,” Healthrageous Chief Technical Officer Doug McClure said, “consumer engagement is terrible.”

Forget sleeping, take ‘strategic naps.’ Though the Institute of Medicine recommends that medical resident shifts longer than 16 hours include an uninterrupted 5-hour sleep period, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education says such a long sleep is unworkable and should be replaced by “strategic napping” during long shifts, according to the Medicine and Technology blog.

Mayo Clinic: stealth investor. Stealthy cardiovascular biotech Anexon Inc. in Cambridge, Massachusetts, reports it has raised $7 million in venture financing, naming the prestigious Mayo Clinic as an investor, reports the Boston Business Journal.

More pipeline pressure for Lilly. The FDA’s surprising refusal to approve diabetes drug Bydureon — a partnership among Eli Lilly, Alkermes and Amylin Pharmaceutical — adds tremendous pressure on the big Indianapolis drugmaker to pursue some kind of deal to bolster its anemic pipeline, writes the Pharmalot blog.

Dollars for Docs. ProPublica intern Nicholas Kusnets tells Cleveland Plain Dealer readers how to use his publication’s Dollars for Docs database to find out which doctors are receiving the biggest payments from drug companies.

Pearl rounds up $69M for COPD therapy. Four-year-old Pearl Therapeutics in Redwood City, California, founded by a pair of Nektar execs armed with some in-licensed particle technology that could be used to treat respiratory ailments, has rounded up $69 million to pursue mid-stage data for its COPD therapy, according to FierceBiotech.