Devices & Diagnostics

Hands off my device! Could medical device hacking become a problem? (Morning Read)

Current medical news and unique business news for anyone who cares about healthcare. Medical device hacking? As innovative technology floods the medical device industry, more questions of safety arise, especially with small and handheld medical devices. Products are now being made with the ability to transmit health information from a patient’s body to professionals, and […]

Current medical news and unique business news for anyone who cares about healthcare.

Medical device hacking? As innovative technology floods the medical device industry, more questions of safety arise, especially with small and handheld medical devices. Products are now being made with the ability to transmit health information from a patient’s body to professionals, and some devices can even be remotely controlled by medical professionals. One Idaho security researcher who is diabetic experimented with his insulin pump and found that an attacker could hack the device to remotely control the pump and alter the readout of the blood-sugar monitor, causing the patient to receive too much or too little insulin. Medical device makers dismiss claims that devices like insulin pumps, pacemakers and deep-brain stimulators could or would be tampered with, but the threat is still worth exploring.

From skin cells to brain cells. Stanford University researchers claim they have turned skin cells into working brain cells, eliminating the need for stem cells in developing treatment for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

Nanofibers to regenerate blood vessels. Researchers at Northwestern University have developed nanofibers that mimic vascular endothelial growth factor, or the regeneration of blood vessels, that could help prevent deprivation of oxygen in tissue, a complication that can lead to damaged heart tissue after a heart attack or amputation in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

Five questions… Dennis Purcell, head of one of the top lifesciences venture capital firms, offers some interesting insight into investing in lifesciences in this Xconomy piece.

IT association takes issue with HITECH Act. In a new report, CompTIA, an IT trade association, says that government policies surround the HITECH Act are keeping small- and mid-sized IT firms from getting their fair share of business. The organization is calling for tweaks to government policies.

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