Devices & Diagnostics

Early stage companies target health sector at Philadelphia conference

Five early stage medical device and health IT companies pitched their ideas at Early Stage East Club Philly 2011, a conference aimed at matching up early stage companies with investors. In its 14th year, the conference introduced a speed dating format aimed at creating more opportunities for companies to pitch to investors, a much more […]

Five early stage medical device and health IT companies pitched their ideas at Early Stage East Club Philly 2011, a conference aimed at matching up early stage companies with investors.

In its 14th year, the conference introduced a speed dating format aimed at creating more opportunities for companies to pitch to investors, a much more intimate take on the practice of companies standing before a crowd of would-be investors making a case for their businesses.

The 30 investment groups ranging from venture capital and angel investors sat at tables and the 34 early stage companies moved from company to company, pitching their businesses.

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A couple of the companies focused on patient monitoring as a tool for healthcare providers to collect and transmit information to and from patients with the ultimate goal of reducing healthcare costs.  Ariotech, in Fort Lee, New Jersey, led by CEO Andy Saffarian, is a medical device company with a focus on interactive patient monitoring and management using its trademarked mobile medical device assistant technology.

Health-E-Babies,  led by Ron Smolow and based in Newtown, Pennsylvania, developed a personal health record device for parents to keep track of their children’s healthcare. The device, aimed at the pediatric/newborn market, uses technology licensed from Get Real Consulting, a health IT company that develops healthcare apps for Microsoft data storage program HealthVault.

Prezacor, a Princeton, New Jersey-based company focused on pain management and led by James Pachence,  seeks to sell a pain management patch called Energezics developed by its partner EuroMed. It plans to sell the patch directly to consumers using the Internet and social media, as well as selling it over the counter, and expects it to be ready for market by the first quarter of 2012.

Advance Response is focused on the claims denial market, aimed at automating claims research, data rationalization, presentment and improving communication between providers and payers.  It has an enterprise software agreement with ACS-Xerox. Its revenue for 2011 is projected at $950,000.

Easy Talk MD‘s software, demonstrated on an iPad and iPhone, is aimed at helping physicians conduct an exam, capturing their data through voice and touch screens on a mobile device for more efficient medical transcription.  The software can be customized by medical specialty, according to CEO Mark Shultz.

KinetiCane‘s product  is a cane aimed at the baby boomer market. The cane is designed by CEO Ron Goldberg and Joseph Goldberg and claims to be the “Apple” of its market space. It is designed to be light, and easy to move and to hold with a fashion flair.

Advance Response

KinetiCane

Easy Talk MD