Automated suture system for minimally invasive surgery raises $5 million

A medical device startup with a reusable, automatic suturing system has raised $5 million to market its curved suturing device for minimally invasive surgery — a device it believes could cut healthcare costs compared with disposable plastics sutures. The company claims its technology, which involves curved needles, replicates the surgical style of manual stitching and […]

A medical device startup with a reusable, automatic suturing system has raised $5 million to market its curved suturing device for minimally invasive surgery — a device it believes could cut healthcare costs compared with disposable plastics sutures. The company claims its technology, which involves curved needles, replicates the surgical style of manual stitching and tying knots.

The newest device uses 5mm ports and expands into a 10mm suturing device. It follows EndoEvolution’s Endo360 suturing device for minimally invasive surgery, which is currently available.

The Spring Bay Companies led Massachusetts-based EndoEvolution’s Series C round. The fundraise coincided with the appointment of CEO Ron Rudowsky, a serial entrepreneur in the medical device space. Rudowsky is replacing founder Jerry Brecher, who will stay on as a member of the leadership team. Rudowsky has previously served as COO of TriMedics, a Boston surgical device manufacturer.

EndoEvolution’s automated sutures are for bariatric, colorectal and general surgery along with gynecology, according to a press release. Last year, Edwards Lifesciences (NYSE:EW) licensed EndoEvolution’s automated suturing device technology for cardiac surgery.

The minimally invasive surgical instrument market is projected to grow to nearly $35.5 billion by 2016.