Map of entrepreneurship gains and losses highlights Kentucky’s rise and PA’s setback

The expansion of startup communities in states around the country is having an impact, a new report on entrepreneurship suggests. The analysis of gains and losses in the 2013 State Entrepreneurship Index by University of Nebraska’s at Lincoln’s Bureau of  Business Research highlighted some usual suspects such as California and New York. But the annual […]

The expansion of startup communities in states around the country is having an impact, a new report on entrepreneurship suggests. The analysis of gains and losses in the 2013 State Entrepreneurship Index by University of Nebraska’s at Lincoln’s Bureau of  Business Research highlighted some usual suspects such as California and New York. But the annual index, published since 2008, also drew attention to gains by states such as Kentucky, which shot up from 49 to four, Connecticut and New Jersey and significant setbacks, particularly for Pennsylvania.

Among the criteria that decided which states rose and fell are: growth in employer establishments, and that same growth per person, business formation rate and patents per thousand persons.

The healthcare startup landscape in Kentucky has been helped with the expansion of Healthbox in Nashville and XLerate in Louisville along with life sciences incubators such as bioLOGIC. Connecticut has several incubator and accelerator programs across the state such as CTech, and University of Connecticut Technology Incubation program. New Jersey accelerators such as TechLaunch and Tigerlabs as well as incubators such as the Commercialization Center for Innovative Technologies have also played a part.

Although North Dakota topped the list over California, it had more to do with the growth in the Midwest state’s energy sector.

Pennsylvania had the biggest drop of any state in the index from seven in 2012 to 38 in 2013.

Pennsylvania’s Life Science Greenhouse program was set up in 2003 to make pre-seed and seed investments in life sciences companies using funds obtained from the state’s tobacco lawsuit settlement. But the state administration has made substantial cuts in recent years to the amount allocated to support life science companies and the programs that support them.