BioPharma

Catch up on BBC’s Orphan Black before the premiere – It’s time

I am officially an Orphan Black enthusiast, and I think anyone out there involved or interested in biotech should get on board. (This is just the beginning of a slightly intense, unfunded promotional push for a show we have no involvement with, so prepare yourself.) Monday morning, in the wee hours, Seasons 1, episodes 1 […]

I am officially an Orphan Black enthusiast, and I think anyone out there involved or interested in biotech should get on board. (This is just the beginning of a slightly intense, unfunded promotional push for a show we have no involvement with, so prepare yourself.)

Monday morning, in the wee hours, Seasons 1, episodes 1 through 4 aired on BBC in an attempt to kick start everyone getting caught up, semi-binge-style, on the clone-tastic action drama. Episodes 5 through 8 will air on Monday, March 23 from 2:00 am till 5:00 am EST.

If you haven’t gotten caught up or watched at all, it’s your own fault, you deserve to be up watching BBC right before sun rise. It’s practically impossible to give you a succinct summary of where things stand now with the show, but here’s a short description from our previous story covering the show, and below is a teaser clip for Season 3, which begins April 18.

The show begins from the perspective of one particular woman who unexpectedly encounters her twisted clone debacle (it happens), which ends up making her life entirely more complicated, confusing and threatened than anyone could prepare for. It turns out there are 11 clones that we’ve been at least somewhat introduced to thus far, some of which are much more thoroughly developed as characters, and are the result of an operation from the illusive Dyad Institute. That then leads to a divisive and provoking plot line involving murder, crime, the analysis of how our DNA does or doesn’t necessarily determine who we are, where science crosses the line and how anyone who has been the result of some sort of scientific intervention can possibly maintain a solid sense of identity.

There’s genome patenting, mysterious genetic conditions that lead to infertility in most of the clones, and monitors regulating the behavior of these characters/test subjects/totally compelling protagonists.

 

 

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