Video: Watch med students dissect virtual 3-D cadavers

MedCity News first got a peek at a virtual cadaver for medical education from San Jose, Calif.-based medical imaging software company Anatomage back in 2013. That technology now is in clinical use, as we learned from this video produced by the University of Connecticut Health Center and shared by the Doctors Channel.

It’s Friday afternoon. How about something fun and fascinating, not to mention, easy for us to write up and post?

At FutureMed 2013, MedCity News first got a peek at a virtual cadaver for medical education from San Jose, Calif.-based medical imaging software company Anatomage. That technology now is in clinical use, as we learned from this video produced by the University of Connecticut Health Center and shared by the Doctors Channel.

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“This is an actual cadaver. There’s a male and a female that have been rendered into 3-D that the students can then manipulate so they can rotate them, they can virtually dissect them, they can essentially do the kinds of things they can do in the anatomy lab,” John Harrison, a professor of craniofacial sciences at UConn Health, said in the video.

“It allows students to visualize tissues in multiple views,” Harrison said. Students and instructors can change the depth of their cuts, zoom in and out and view parts of the body either with and without skin on the device’s tabletop touch screen.

And, best of all, med schools don’t have to wait for more people to die to get their hands on fresh cadavers. Or is the best part that there’s no formaldehyde?

[Image from Anatomage]